Surgeon

Dr. Chris Ralphs

DACVS

Dr. Chris Ralphs, DACVS grew up in Hatfield Pennsylvania, a small town whose only real claim to fame is a pork processing plant (100% Hatfield is 100% good!). This led him to assiduously avoid porcine medicine when he graduated from Cornell University in 1998. He did a one year internship at Darien Animal Hospital (now VREC) in Norwalk Connecticut. After discovering that an inability to write legibly does not necessarily mean you can’t do surgery well, he did a surgical internship at Gulf Coast Veterinary Specialists in Houston, TX where he, among other dubious honors, won the Class D championship in curling. From there he moved to Minnesota for a small animal surgery residency where learned to enjoy ice fishing, cross country skiing and other cold weather sports… and also some surgery. He met his wife Kristen while there (she was an intern- scandalous!) and in 2003 they moved to Pittsburg together where he practiced at Pittsburg Veterinary Specialists for three years. With the birth of his first daughter, they moved to Rhode Island where Chris took a job at Ocean State Veterinary Hospital.

Along the way, Chris has published articles on topics as varied as intestinal anastomosis risks, meniscus injuries, Stomach Compartment Theory (which explains why you always have room for dessert. In the Annals of Irreproducible Results, seriously!), recto-urethral fistula repair, erosive polyarthritis, and many equally forgettable topics! He also wrote the Veterinary Medicine chapter of Auerbach’s Wilderness Medicine textbook. He has always enjoyed teaching (at least to an attentive audience, which rules out his children) and speaking engagements of note include the keynote speaker at the Northern New England Alpine Veterinary Symposium and a lecturer at the first ever Vetgirl U in Minneapolis!

While Chris enjoys many outdoor pursuits such as mountain biking, hiking, paddleboarding and lawn/crabgrass mowing, he spends most of his time trying to be a good doctor, husband and father to his two daughters. If he does well in any two of those three on any given day that is a good day! He loves his two daughters dearly but is finding that teenage girls are as mysterious and confusing now as they were when he was a teenager.